Last week, this blog complained about an article in the Journal Gazette being totally unbalanced and unfair.

This time around, the Journal Gazette offered a more balanced commentary. However, the assumption that one side is demanding way too much and the other side is offering way too little is not necessarily accurate. Why not wait until a resolution is reached?

One positive thing is that Tim Pape and Mark GiaQuinta are counsel for the respective sides. This bodes well for some type of effort to try to resolve the issues. Both are great lawyers. The notion of allowing Aqua Indiana to continue with the sewers would be a benefit for not only the company, but also the community.

http://www.journalgazette.net/article/20130127/EDIT0502/301279972/1021/EDIT

In preparing for a City Council vote, the Henry administration hired former Democratic City Councilman Tim Pape, an attorney, to help with strategy. Aqua Indiana has former councilman and attorney Mark GiaQuinta in its corner.

Just about the only thing city residents and Aqua Indiana customers can be sure of is that both sides are jockeying to get the best price, and much of what they are hearing is aimed toward gaining an edge in negotiating.

Aqua Indiana says its water utility is worth $60 million if it’s worth a dime, and the company hints there is no way the city can buy it without raising rates for all water customers. That’s already gotten the attention of Councilman Glynn Hines, who represents some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods in the southeast part of the city and wants more or a less a guarantee that rate hikes won’t happen……

Even though Aqua Indiana said last week that a deal is close, the city demurred.

 

Still, it’s a good sign that last week’s presentations by the two sides before City Council were called off.

It’s hard to negotiate in good faith after each side bashes the other in public, which was nearly certain to happen. And besides, we could all use a break from the saber rattling.